Scientists Reverse Aging in Mice Brains by Decades, Paves Way for Human Trials

scientists-reverse-aging-in-mice-brains-by-decades-paves-way-for-human-trials

In a ‘jaw-dropping’ scientific breakthrough, scientists claim they may have discovered a way to reverse brain aging by decades.

The University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and the University of Queensland in Australia found that when PF4, a naturally produced blood protein, was given to mice, older mice regained the mental acuity of middle-aged mice and younger mice became more intelligent. 

The cognitive function of two-year-old rodents, which is equivalent to a 70-year-old human, was restored to that of a 30- or 40-year-old, according to research.  

Platelet-derived PF4, a blood cell, can help restore brain function by settling the immune system and halting inflammation, which contributes to brain and body aging. Blood transfusions from young mice to older mice, exercise, and klotho, a gene implicated in the aging process, were also discovered to increase PF4 levels in the body. 

With PF4, we are beginning to comprehend the terminology underlying this revitalization. It is now time to investigate platelet factors in relation to brain health and cognitive enhancement. 

In addition, it is unknown what secondary effects shutting down the immune system to prevent aging could have on the human body, such as affecting our ability to fend off disease.

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PF4 and Klotho in Enhancing Brain Function: Potentials in Age-Related Cognitive Decline and Exercise Limitations

scientists-reverse-aging-in-mice-brains-by-decades-paves-way-for-human-trials
In a ‘jaw-dropping’ scientific breakthrough, scientists claim they may have discovered a way to reverse brain aging by decades.

In the PF4 study, researchers discovered that injecting the protein into aged animals restored a portion of their brain function by reducing immune activity in the body and brain.

These animals demonstrated superior memory and learning abilities.

In the second study, scientists discovered that klotho increased the body’s production of PF4.

PF4 had a profound effect on the region of the brain responsible for memory formation, increasing the formation of new connections.

In behavioral tests, it improved the cognitive function of both old and young animals, leading Dr. Dubal to conclude that there is room for improvement even in young brains

Following physical activity, platelets released PF4 into the circulation, according to research on exercise.

However, Tara Walker, the study’s main author and a professor of neuroscience at the University of Queensland, remarked that exercise is not feasible for many people with health conditions, problems with mobility, or advanced age, making pharmacological intervention a critical field of study.

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Source: Daily Mail

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