Major UPenn Donor Pulls Back $100M Pledge Following President’s Antisemitism Testimony

Major-UPenn-Donor-Pulls-Back-$100M-Pledge-Following-President’s-Antisemitism-Testimony

In protest of the University of Pennsylvania’s handling of antisemitism on campus and the contentious testimony given by the college’s president, a significant donor to the university is withholding a gift estimated to be worth $100 million.

Ross Stevens, the founder and CEO of Stone Ridge Asset Management, made a donation to the University of Pennsylvania in 2017, contributing partnership units valued at approximately $100 million. 

The purpose of the gift was to assist the university in establishing a financial innovation center. 

Recently, attorneys representing Stevens sent a letter to the university, asserting that Penn breached Stone Ridge’s limited partnership agreement by failing to adhere to anti-discrimination and anti-harassment provisions. 

The letter expressed Stevens and Stone Ridge’s deep concern regarding the university’s position on antisemitism, describing them as “appalled by the University’s stance on antisemitism on campus.” 

Furthermore, it contended that Penn’s lenient approach to hate speech, particularly calls for violence against Jews, and its laissez-faire attitude toward harassment and discrimination against Jewish students, contravene policies or regulations that prohibit such behaviors based on religion, including those established by Stone Ridge.

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Stevens and Stone Ridge Critique President Magill’s Testimony on Antisemitism

Major-UPenn-Donor-Pulls-Back-$100M-Pledge-Following-President’s-Antisemitism-Testimony
In protest of the University of Pennsylvania’s handling of antisemitism on campus and the contentious testimony given by the college’s president, a significant donor to the university is withholding a gift estimated to be worth $100 million.

Stevens and Stone Ridge expressed dissatisfaction with President Liz Magill’s recent testimony to the House Education and Workforce Committee. 

They highlighted her assertion that the prohibition of antisemitic chants and calls for the genocide of Jewish people on campus is “context-dependent.” 

The letter emphasized that Magill’s subsequent clarification on social media appeared to acknowledge that such rhetoric would indeed violate Penn’s rules on harassment and discrimination if it met specific criteria, namely being “directed,” “pervasive,” and “severe.”

In reaction to the criticism, Magill released a video on Wednesday clarifying that her testimony during the hearing centered on university policies and constitutional protections of free speech. 

However, she emphasized the unequivocal stance that “a call for genocide of Jewish people is threatening, deeply so.”

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