Pros and Cons: How Eating Lots of Eggs Affects Your Digestion?

pros-and-cons-how-eating-lots-of-eggs-affects-your-digestion

Over the years, there have been many praises and criticisms of eggs as a lean protein source. Fitness fanatics use it as an inexpensive and simple way to consume a lot of protein, but the medical community has shifted from denouncing it as a threat to cardiovascular health to saying it has no effect on a person’s blood cholesterol levels. 

Let’s talk about intestinal health now.

It’s natural to wonder how the humble egg fits into all of this, whether it’s due to the prevalence of irritable bowel diseases (IDB) like Crohn’s and ulcerative colitis or other digestive issues like bloating, gas, and diarrhea, or because gut health affects a lot of other things like your immune system, mental health, digestion, sleep, and risk of diabetes, heart disease, and autoimmune disorders. 

Does it help your stomach or not? 

It has been discovered that eating eggs on a daily basis can help people with IBD, particularly during flare-ups. Eggs include readily digested protein that can aid with stomach healing.

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Eggs Provide Additional Gut-Friendly Nutrients

pros-and-cons-how-eating-lots-of-eggs-affects-your-digestion
It has been discovered that eating eggs on a daily basis can help people with IBD, particularly during flare-ups.

Doctors that specialize in gut health frequently suggest eggs since they are inexpensive and a great source of gut-friendly nutrients like methionine, omega-3 fatty acids, and vitamins A and D. 

In case you were aware of the studies conducted on the choline content of eggs and the hypothesis that it elevates the synthesis of trimethylamine-n-oxide, or TMAO, in your gut microbiota, hence raising your risk of heart attacks or strokes, you should know that these theories have been refuted by medical professionals. 

Dr. Mark Hyman, a functional medicine specialist and family physician, clarified that the 2017 study was extremely small (18 individuals) and solely connected supplemental choline with an increase in TMAO.

A follow-up study conducted in 2021 and published in the American Journal of Medicine discovered that the reason for this surge was not dietary choline found in eggs, but rather supplementary choline.

Dr. Hyman claims that while supplementary choline made in a lab is one thing, the choline found in eggs is quite different. Choline is an essential ingredient for the health of the brain and cells. 

The doctor said that even for people who are concerned about their cholesterol, eating a few eggs each day is not harmful. What does this imply for gut health, then? Can anyone consume the 1-2 eggs per day that are safely advised?

Concerns Regarding Egg Consumption And Gut Health

pros-and-cons-how-eating-lots-of-eggs-affects-your-digestion
It has been discovered that eating eggs on a daily basis can help people with IBD, particularly during flare-ups.

Not only can eating eggs affect your gut microbiome, but your entire diet also has an impact on it. For instance, it’s believed that eating a lot of processed food and saturated fat will change your gut flora. Actually, there was no connection found between eating eggs and changes in your gut microbiota. 

This implies that not everyone will tolerate eggs the same way that you do. For instance, the GI Society states that the sulfur component of eggs may create gas in certain individuals. Additionally, eggs may not be well tolerated if you have digestive problems, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), particularly if you’re constipated. 

Eggs can exacerbate IBS if your symptoms are conducive to constipation and abdominal pain. Because of their high protein content, eggs may make constipation worse. Additionally, it’s possible that you have an allergy to eggs.

In summary, eggs have numerous nutritional advantages that can be critical for individuals with digestive disorders (and even for those without).

Though experts frequently suggest this lean protein to individuals suffering from diarrhea and Crohn’s disease as a more palatable way to obtain essential nutrients than other animal proteins, if you’re worried that it might aggravate any gastrointestinal problems you may have, you might want to talk to your doctor about incorporating more eggs into your diet.

 

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